September 17, 2015

Rutgers and the Art of College Football Recruiting

This week I wanted to add a post about college football recruiting. I wanted to do it because my undergraduate alma mater, Rutgers University, has made the sports news pages for the wrong reasons. These incidents will be devastating for a college football program that had shown promise and gained […]
September 17, 2015

A New York Times College List That Makes Some Sense

Today I saw a different college list on the New York Times online. This college list, prepared by The Upshot, a regular column, ranks colleges for accessibility to students from low and middle-income families. The main determinant of the ranking on this college list, the College Access Index, is based on the […]
September 16, 2015

The Value of the Federal College Scorecard

This week I have had a chance to play with the newest tool offered by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) called the College Scorecard. The new College Scorecard has two useful features that I had not found on other sites. You can find out, courtesy of state unemployment insurance […]
September 16, 2015

Is the University of Oregon a ‘Good’ School?

I have not had the opportunity to visit the University of Oregon though I have seen its football team, in various uniforms, compete on national TV. This week the Chronicle of Higher Education featured a story on the University of Oregon that Educated Quest visitors might find useful in their own quests to […]
September 13, 2015

Should a Military Service Academy be called a ‘Public Ivy’?

I’ll be writing shortly about my “Public Ivy” schools for 2015-16.  Beginning three years ago, I named each of the military service academies a Public Ivy, along with several other public colleges and universities whose names that you will recognize, and some that you might not. Today I’m reposting a […]
September 13, 2015

Why Do Colleges Use Six-Year Graduation Rates?

This is college rankings season when different “college guides” release their data based on how they rank. It really bothers me to see that these so-called guides use the six-year graduation rate, when they should be reporting on how effective colleges are, and have historically been, at graduating their students […]
September 2, 2015

It’s Not Too Early for College Freshmen to Get Serious About College Costs

Today the second of a two-part series on personal finance for college freshmen, Top 5 Money Saving Tips for When Starting College, appeared on HuffPost College today. Co-authored by economist Lisa Kaess, founder/producer of Feminomics.com, and myself, this article provides tips about managing some of the indirect costs–those that do not appear on […]
September 2, 2015

Its Not Too Early for College Freshmen to Get Serious About Personal Finance

  Yesterday Huff Post College ran an article,  Top 5 Tips for College Success and Beyond, co-authored by Lisa Kaess, founder and producer of Feminomics.com and myself. This is the first of two articles where Lisa and I will provide personal finance tips for incoming college freshmen. This first article covers “macro” tips […]
September 1, 2015

What if a College Does Not Play College Football?

I just finished reading a very interesting book about college football, Billion Dollar Ball, written by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gilbert Gaul. This book talks about the costs of college football to larger universities, especially to fans, students and their families. This book will help anyone who hates college football to make a […]